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A list of international relations events in the DC area.

Calendar for the Week of February 28th, 2011

Week of February 28
 

CSI Libya Discussion Happy Hour

CSI Tabletop Discussion Happy Hour
Wednesday, March 2, 6:30pm

Qadafi may be one of the most controversial leaders in modern history. This week he defied international calls for restraint against protesters as 1000's have been reported killed. He has vowed to fight till death, claiming the demonstrations held across the Arab world are part of the US conspiracy. However, Qadafi has not always been seen in such a negative light. He was appointed to head the African Union in 2009, and being his female body guard is a highly sought out position.

Who is Qadafi? What will he do next? Does he really have psychological issues or does his speeches have some point that is simply denied by his opponents?

Conflict Solutions International would like to invite you to a table top discussion to discuss Qadafi and his past, present and future.  No speakers, No panelists. Just order a drink or coffee and lets spark a friendly, and maybe controversial conversation. 

J Street Conference
Feb 26-29, All day
Be a part of a bold vision of diversity and tolerance, peace and compromise, compassion and justice for Israel and for the Jewish community. This year, our conference will be even bigger and will build on the stunning growth of our movement, bringing together activists, students, leaders, and thinkers from around the country and the Middle East.

 

Security, Drugs, and Democracy in Latin America  

Feb 28: 8:30am-1:00pm

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602, 1957 E Street, NW, Washington, D.C.
This event is the Latin American and Hemispheric Studies Program Annual Conference. Luncheon to follow. Please RSVP at: http://tiny.cc/4cl3t. Sponsored by the Latin American and Hemispheric Studies Program

Prospects for Brazilian-American Relations on the Eve of President Obama's Visit to Brazil

Feb 28: 9:00am-11:30am

Woodrow Wilson Center, 6th Floor Auditorium, Washington D.C.

President Barack Obama’s March 19-20 trip to Brazil opens a new opportunity for engagement between America’s two largest democracies and biggest economies. This comes after a period of estrangement caused by serious misunderstandings around the 2009 constitutional crisis in Honduras and the 2010 efforts by Brazil and Turkey to mediate between Iran and the international community on the Tehran nuclear program.

Turkey: A Model For the New Middle East.
Feb 28: 10:30am-12:00PM
Falk Auditorium, The Brookings Institution, 1775 Massachusetts Ave., NW
The historic developments in Tunisia and Egypt have triggered debate about the future direction of political leadership in those countries. Some analysts question whether Egypt will follow an "Iranian model," with Islamic extremists eventually taking control of the government.

Killed Without Consequence: Why the Murder of Russian Journalists Matters Beyond Russia
Feb 28: 12:00pm-1:00pm
Woodrow Wilson Center, 6th Floor Auditorium, Washington D.C.
In Russia, 19 journalists have been murdered in retaliation for their work since 2000. In only one case have the immediate killers been convicted, and in none of the cases have the masterminds been punished. This climate of impunity breeds further violence and fosters self-censorship in the Russian press, leaving issues of vital importance under-reported or entirely uncovered.

Spanish-Language Media and the Issues that Move Latino Voters
Feb 28: 12:00pm-1:30pm
Center for American Progress, 1333 H St. NW, 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20005
Latinos constitute the second-largest group in the United States today and it is expected that by the year 2050 they will make up one-third of the U.S. population. Spanish-dominant voters, traditionally swing voters, have played a pivotal role in increasing the political participation of Latinos and were a key segment to drive up turnout in the 2008 and 2010 elections.

Self Interest, Altruism, and Super-Altruism in Foreign Aid: A Theoretical Model and Empirical Test
Feb 28: 12:30pm-2:00pm
Kendrick Conference Room, Room 321, 2115 G Street, NW, Washington D.C.
Andrew Horowitz, Professor of Economics at the University of Arkansas
IIEP Trade and Development Workshop Series and Inequality and Poverty in the Global Economy Forum.Please send RSVP to: http://tinyurl.com/iieptradeworkshop. Sponsored by the Institute for International Economic Policy

A Lecture and Discussion with Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf
Feb 28: 3pm
School of International Service, Founders’ Lounge, Terrace Level
Imam Feisal, a voice for Islamic moderation, works to reconcile Muslims and the West. His proposal for an Islamic center near Manhattan’s Ground Zero raised a furor, especially among conservatives, and raised questions about the basic tenets of Islam. The Middle East uprisings spark new questions about the role of religion in government and the proper U.S. response to a changing Arab world.

"The European External Action Service: Results Thus Far"
Feb 28: 4:00pm-5:00pm
Room 500, The Bernstein-Offit Building
Christian Leffler, managing director for the Americas with the EU's European External Action Service, will discuss this topic. Members of the public should RSVP to the SAIS Center for Transatlantic Relations at transatlanticrsvp@jhu.edu or 202.663.5880.

Arab Voices: What They are Saying to Us, and Why it Matters
Feb 28: 6:30pm-8:00pm
Busboys and Poets, 5th & K
Busboys and Poets welcomes Author and President of the Arab American Institute, Dr. James Zogby to discuss and sign his new book, "Arab Voices: What They Are Saying to Us, and Why it Matters." The Arab World is a region that has been vastly misunderstood in the West. Arab Voices asks the questions, collects the answers, and shares the results that will help us see Arabs clearly.

International Correspondents Panel to Analyze Digital Media's Role in Egypt.
Feb 28: 6:30pm-8:30pm
First Amendment Lounge, National Press Club
A panel of journalists will explore how the digital media revolution sparked the popular uprising that ousted Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. Riz Khan, host of ³The Riz Khan Show² on Al Jazeera English, will give the keynote address and discuss how Al Jazeera stayed on top of the breaking news in Egypt despite government attempts to shut down the Internet. Earlier in his career, he held senior editorial positions at the BBC and CNN International.

Organization of Asian Studies Film Series: Memories of Matsuko (Japan)
Feb 28: 6:30pm-8:40pm
The Chung-wen Shih Conference Room, Room 503, 1957 E Street, NW, Washington D.C.
The greatest musical about a hot-as-hell dead bag lady ever filmed! An unlikely cross between Moulin Rouge, Citizen Kane and Amelie, ,i>Memories of Matsuko is a magical realist descent into the suppressed history (both farce and tragedy) of the most unfortunate woman you've ever seen on screen, enriched by the one-of-a-kind visual style of director Tetsuya Nakashima, who truly makes this epic/musical/melodrama sing like no other.

Covering Egypt: The Media and the Revolution
Feb 28: 6:30pm
National Press Club, 529 14th Street NW, 13th Floor
In Egypt, all the new tools in the digital media revolution came into play. From
Al Jazeera's deep coverage to citizen journalists posting photos on Facebook, the world
received a vivid picture of what was happening on the ground despite the government
attempt to shut down the Internet. Al Jazeera's Riz Khan will discuss how his organization
stayed on top of the breaking news. His remarks will be followed by a panel discussion
with distinguished experts on the media scene in Egypt.

Arab Voices
Feb 28: 6:30pm
Bus Boys and Poets, 5th and K St.
Author and President of the Arab American Institute, Dr. James Zogby to discuss and sign his new book, "Arab Voices: What They Are Saying to Us, and Why it Matters." The Arab World is a region that has been vastly misunderstood in the West. Arab Voices asks the questions, collects the answers, and shares the results that will help us see Arabs clearly. The book will bring into stark relief the myths, assumptions, and biases that hold us back from understanding this important people. Here, James Zogby debuts a brand new, comprehensive poll, bringing numbers to life so that we can base policy and perception on the real world, rather than on a conjured reality.

Democracy, Dissent, and Digital Media in the Arab World
Mar 1: 8:30am-11:00am
Rayburn Building, Room B-369
The latest uprisings in the Arab region have revived the debate about the power of digital media. Mass demonstrations across the region have caused the downfall of two governments and led to major changes in others. From Tunisia to Egypt to Yemen, digital media have played a vital role in mobilizing protesters and transmitting information in real time around the globe. Yet some argue that the influence of these tools has been greatly exaggerated. A panel of experts and activists will examine the strengths and vulnerabilities of digital media in supporting protests across the Arab world.

European and Global Security after New START Russia and the Security of Poland
Mar 1: 9:00am-10:30am
Center for American Progress, 1333 H St. NW, 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20005
Please join the Center for American Progress as we host Poland’s Minister of Foreign Affairs Radosław Sikorski to discuss the new Poland-Russia relationship and European and global security issues after the ratification of New START.

"Africa's New Era: Learning From the Past and Preparing for the Future (Day 1)"
Mar 1: 9:30am-5:00pm
Kenney Auditorium, The Nitze Building (main building)
Festus Mogae, former President of Botswana, will deliver the keynote address at 12:45 p.m. For a full agenda of the conference, visit htttp://www.sais-jhu.edu/centers/ schwartzforum/pdf/Africa confoverview.pdf. For more information and to RSVP, contactrbwashington@jhu.edu or 202.663.5650.

China’s New Breed of State Capitalism
Mar 1: 10:00am-12:00pm
Falk Auditorium, The Brookings Institution, 1775 Massachusetts Ave., NW, Washington, DC
There is a growing perception in China that the largest state-owned enterprises are expanding at the expense of the private sector, slowing or even reversing a trend toward greater economic liberalization that has been the hallmark of China’s economic policy for the last three decades. Known popularly in China as guojin mintui or “the state advances and the private sector retreats,” this apparent enhancement of state monopolies has in recent months been fiercely debated in Beijing.

Turkey’s Regional Perspectives on Eurasia and East Asia
Mar 1: 10:30am-11:45am
Woodrow Wilson Center, 6th Floor Boardroom. Washington D.C
Ambassador Fatih Ceylan, Deputy Undersecretary for Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, Central and East Asia, and the Pacifica, Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Turkey)

Protracted Mass Displacement in Afghanistan and Iraq     An EU-sponsored Project Featuring:
Mar 1: 12:00pm-1:15pm
MEI Boardman Room, 1761 N Street, NW, Washington, DC 20036
he Middle East Institute, in partnership with the Fondation Pour le Recherche Strategique, is proud to host Dr. Susanne Schmeidl and Dr. Geraldine Chatelard for a discussion situations of protracted mass displacement in Afghanistan and Iraq.   Funded by the European Commission, the project aims to generate policy recommendations that will strengthen transatlantic cooperation to respond to the refugee crises in the above-mentioned countries.  

Security Policy Forum: Egypt: After the Revolution
Mar 1: 12:00pm-1:15pm
Lindner Family Commons, Room 602, 1957 E Street, NW
Michele Dunne, Co-chair, Bipartisan Working Group of Egypt; Senior Associate, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Lunch will be served. Please RSVP at: http://tiny.cc/spfegypt. Sponsored by Institute for Middle Eastern Studies and the Institute for Security and Conflict Studies

U.S. Influence and the Informal Rules of the IMF
Mar 1: 12:00pm-2:00pm
City View Room, 7th Floor, 1957 E Street, NW, Washington D.C.
Mr. Stone's research focuses on international political economy that combines formal theory, quantitative methods, and qualitative fieldwork. He is the author of Lending Credibility (Princeton University Press, 2002) and Satellites and Commissars(Princeton University Press, 1996), as well as articles in the American Political Science Review, International Organization, International Studies Quarterly, The Journal of Conflict Resolution, Review of International Organizations, and Global Environmental Politics.

Conversations with Scholars: Thoughts on US-China Relations with Bruce Reynolds
Mar 1: 12:30pm-2:00pm
The Chung-wen Shih Conference Room, Room 503, 1957 E Street, NW
Mr. Reynolds is a professor of economics at the University of Virginia and a visiting scholar this year at the Elliott School of International Affairs' Institute for International Economic Policy. He first visited China in 1973, was a visiting scholar at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, and has visited China nearly every year since 1988. In the 1980s, Mr. Reynolds was one of the first American economists to study Chinese economic reform and published articles such as "Choosing a Strategy for China's Economic Reform" (American Economic Review, 1988).

Quantifying Vulnerability to Climate Change: Implications for Adaption Assistance
Mar 1: 12:30pm-2:00pm
Monroe Hall, Kendrick Conference Room, Room 321, 2115 G Street, NW
David Wheeler, Senior Fellow, Center for Global Development
Trade and Development Workshop Series . Please RSVP here: http://tinyurl.com/iieptradeworkshop Sponsored by the Institute for International Economic Policy

Building a 21st Century Border: Regional Master Plans and Transportation Infrastructure
Mar 1: 1:30pm-4:45pm
Woodrow Wilson Center, 6th Floor Auditorium, Washington D.C.
Stewart Tuttle, U.S.-Mexico Border Affairs Coordinator, Department of State
Ralph Scalise, Southern Border Program Office, General Services Administration
Enrique Escorza Zamudio, Head of Section, Political and Border Affairs, Embassy of Mexico. Jackie Mitchell Edwards, Chief Operating Officer, The Paso del Norte Group
Rep. Russ Jones, Arizona House of Representatives; Member, Border Legislative Conference

Yanukovych's Ukraine: Results from the First Year
Mar 1: 4:00pm-5:30pm
Room 505, 1957 E Street, NW
President Viktor Yanukovych came to power in Ukraine one year ago. His rule marked a dramatic shift away from the 2004 Orange Revolution. Under his leadership, Ukraine has greatly improved its relationship with Russia. However, it has suffered significant setbacks in terms of democratic institution building. Similarly, it remains dependent on the International Monetary Fund to boost and reform its ailing economy.

The Use of Open Space Technology in China and Around the World
Mar 1: 4:00pm-6:00pm
Room 533, The Rome Building
Harrison Owen, originator of Open Space Technology, and Song Qinghua, president of Shining Stone Community Action, will discuss this topic. Note: Song Qinghua's remarks will be given in Chinese and then translated. For more information and to RSVP, contact athurst1@jhu.edu or 202.663.7727.

Reforming U.S. Foreign Assistance: Dream or Reality?
Mar 1: 6:00pm-8:00pm
Lindner Family Commons, Room 602, 1957 E Street, NW
Please join the International Development Forum for a panel discussion on the current efforts to reform U.S. foreign aid and development assistance.
Light refreshments will be served. This event is part of the International Development Forum. Please RSVP at: http://aidreform.eventbrite.com/. Sponsored by the International Development Studies Program and the Organization for International Development (OID)

Inclusive Capitalism for the American Workforce
Mar 2: 9:30am-11:00am
Center for American Progress, 1333 H St. NW, 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20005
For the past several decades, most of the benefits of economic growth have gone to those at the very top and have largely bypassed average workers. Wages for most workers have been nearly stagnant and income inequality in the United States is now at levels not seen since the Great Depression.

New START: What We Now Know and What's Next
Mar 2: 9:30am-11:30am
Lehrman Auditorium
The Obama Administration and Moscow had barely exchanged the paperwork to implement the newly ratified New START arms control treaty when some startling revelations came to light. As several U.S. Senators and experts had posited before it was ratified, these revelations indicate the treaty will negatively impact U.S. missile defenses and transatlantic relations.

"Africa's New Era: Learning From the Past and Preparing for the Future (Day 2)"
Mar 2: 9:30am-12:00pm
Kenney Auditorium, The Nitze Building (main building)
Various speakers will discuss this topic on day two of the event. For a full agenda of the conference, visit http://www.sais-jhu.edu/centers/schwartzforum/pdf/Africaconfoverview.pdf. For more information and to RSVP, contactrbwashington@jhu.edu or 202.663.5650.

Bolivia: Competing Worldviews and Agendas  
Mar 2: 11:00am-2:00pm
Room 505, 1957 E Street, NW
Simón Yampara is a well-know Aymara intellectual who has published various books and articles on Andean cosmovision and civilizatory roots, the most recent being an essay on "Links Between the Civilization of Tiwanaku and the Bolivian Constitution." Dr. Yampara is currently the Delegate for Intercultural Affairs in the mayor's office in La Paz and history professor at the University of El Alto.

NONVIOLENCE AS A MEANS FOR SOCIAL CHANGE
Mar 2: 12:00pm-1:00pm
East-West Center, Burns Hall, Rm. 3012
Arun Gandhi grew up under the apartheid laws of South Africa. Beaten by "white" South Africans for being too black and "black" South Africans for being too white; Arun sought justice. However, he learned from his parents and grandparents that justice does not mean revenge, it means transforming the opponent through love and suffering.

Fair and Rules-based: A New Trade Policy for Europe
Mar 2: 12:30pm-2:00pm
Room 505, 1957 E Street, NW
Lucian Cernat, Chief Trade Economist, European Commission. Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/iieppolicyforum. Sponsored by the Institute for International Economic Policy and International Economic Policy Forum

Renewable Energy in Developing Countries: Meaningful GHG Emission Reductions or Just Another Con?
Mar 2: 12:30pm-2:00pm
Rome Building Auditorium, The Rome Building
Peter Meier, an independent energy economist and consultant, will discuss this topic. For more information and to RSVP, contacteregloballeaders@jhu.edu.

Lunch & Learn Green Justice: The Environment and Human Rights
Mar 2: 12:30
Marrakesh Palace Restaurant     2147 P Street, NW
Join us for a Conversation on The Environment and Human Rights with Daniel B. Magraw, President Emeritus and Distinguished Scholar at the Center for International Environmental Law (CIEL).

"The Global Financial Crisis"
Mar 2: 12:45pm-1:45pm
Room 517, The Nitze Building (main building)
Augusto de la Torre, chief economist for Latin America and the Caribbean at the World Bank, will discuss "Its Implications for Financial Development in Latin America's Financial Development Policy." For more information and to RSVP, contact jzurek1@jhu.edu or 202.663.5734.

Harnessing Trade for Shared Growth, American Competitiveness and Just Jobs
Mar 2: 1:00pm-2:00pm
Center for American Progress, 1333 H St. NW, 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20005
The United States is the world's largest economy and the largest exporter and importer of goods and services. But today, America's workers and businesses are facing many economic challenges. There is a need to create more well-paying, sustainable jobs for our country's workforce. In light of these challenges, what is the Obama administration's trade policy?

"New Security Challenges, New NATO"
Mar 2: 2:00pm-3:00pm
Room 806, The Rome Building
James Appathurai, deputy assistant secretary general for political affairs and security policy and special representative for the Caucasus and Central Asia for NATO, will discuss this topic. For more information and to RSVP, contacttransatlanticrsvp@jhu.edu or 202.663.5880.

Japan Freedom of Information Act 10th Anniversary
Mar 2: 4:30pm-6:00pm
Room 806, The Rome Building
Lawrence Repeta, professor of law at Meiji University in Japan, will discuss "A Real Tool of Empowerment or Much Ado About Nothing?" For more information and to RSVP, contact reischauer@jhu.eduor 202.663.5812.

The Hidden Crisis: Armed Conflict and Education
Mar 2: 2:30pm-4:00pm
Falk Auditorium, The Brookings Institution, 1775 Massachusetts Ave., NW, Washington, DC
When wars break out, international attention and media reporting invariably focus on the most immediate images of human suffering. Yet, behind these images is a hidden crisis. Across many of the world’s poorest countries, armed conflict is destroying not just school infrastructure, but the hopes and ambitions of generations of children.

Selling a Western Way of Life? The Politics of Popular Culture in Cold War Yugoslavia
Mar 2: 4:00pm-5:30pm
Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412, 1957 E Street, NW
Western popular culture is often credited with contributing to the collapse of communism. As the Cold War division of the world was crumbling apart, Western radio broadcasts, popular tunes, fashions and youth cultures were praised for nurturing the hope of a different way of life, one presumably associated with the West.

US Trade Agenda 2011: Moving Forward?
Mar 3: 10:00am-12:00pm
B1 - Conference Center, CSIS, 1800 K St. NW, Washington, DC 20006
On behalf of the Center for Strategic and International Studies, it is my pleasure to invite you to join us for the 2011 Former USTR Trade Seminar.
While the last two years have yielded minimal progress on the U.S. trade agenda,   international economic developments continue to demand our government’s active engagement

An Indonesian View of the 21st Century
Mar 3: 10:30am-11:30am
Lehrman Auditorium
How Indonesia views the world will largely determine how it develops at home and how it interacts internationally in the years to come. Up and coming Indonesian leader and now Ambassador to the United States, Dino Djalal, will offer his optimistic vision of the 21st century and how nations can adapt.

"African Governance Report: Elections and the Management of Diversity of Africa"
Mar 3: 12:30pm-2:00pm
Rome Building Auditorium, The Rome Building
Said Adejumobi, chief of the Public Administration Section at the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa, will discuss this topic. For more information and to RSVP, contact itolber1@jhu.edu or 202.663.5676.

The Russian Presidential Election of March 2012: Its Impact on Current Politics
Mar 3: 2:00pm-3:30pm
Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412, 1957 E Street, NW
In 2005-2007, high politics in Russia was heavily influenced by largely covert struggles over who should become president and prime minister in 2008. Putin was subjected to powerful pressures. Sergei Ivanov was evidently dropped by the Putin circle as its presidential candidate only in September 2007. Medvedev was only chosen as his replacement at the last minute - in December. Also, it seems unlikely that Putin was happy to feel he had to become prime minister.

A Public Forum With His Excellency Felipe Calderón Hinojosa
Mar 3: 4:00pm-5:00pm
Woodrow Wilson Center, 6th Floor Flom Auditorium, Washington D.C
His Excellency Felipe Calderón Hinojosa, President of Mexico. President Calderón will discuss the current political and economic situation in Mexico.

Getting Better: Why Global Development Is Succeeding – And How We Can Improve the World Even More
Mar 3: 6:00pm-7:00pm
1800 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20036
Few doubt the conventional wisdom that the world is going to hell in a hand basket. Development contrarian Charles Kenny is out to prove the Cassandras wrong with his new book Getting Better: Why Global Development is Succeeding – And How We Can Improve the World Even More. Kenny argues that the 21st Century is the best of times in terms of health, education, political freedoms and access to infrastructure and new technologies, and that even the poorest have benefited.

Words & Wires Series: Afghanistan Journal with Joshua Foust
Mar 3: 7:00pm-8:30pm
Young Professionals in Foreign Policy, Washington D.C.
In early 2009, Joshua Foust, a long-time Afghan-affairs aficionado and respected blogger, got his first chance to go to the country he had been fascinated with for so long.

Human Rights and the Arts in Iran Today
Mar 4: 9:00am-12:30pm
Woodrow Wilson Center, 5th Floor Conference Room, Washington DC
Human rights violations are not an uncommon occurrence in Iran over the past decade. Media accounts and documentations of these infringements upon women's rights, minority rights, and rights of minors are increasingly numerous, however, conversations about rights and the arts have been limited thus far.

Deadly Communities: Anti-Jewish Pogroms in the Shadow of the Holocaust
Mar 4: 12:00pm-1:30pm
Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412, 1957 E Street, NW
Why, after the outbreak of World War II in Eastern Europe, did the inhabitants of some communities erupt in violence against their Jewish neighbors? Mr. Kopstein will argue that the greater the degree of preexisting intercommunal polarization between Jews and the titular majority group, the more likely it was that a pogrom would occur.

Environmental Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Challenges and Prospects
Mar 4: 2:00pm-3:45pm
Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412, 1957 E Street, NW
In Northeast Asia, environmental degradation and competition over scarce resources have the potential to contribute to political tension in a region that still has many remaining territorial disputes and where distrust among neighboring countries is still an issue. Recently, the region has seen new efforts to improve inter-regional cooperation between states, such as Russia, China and Japan.

PERFORMING KOREANNESS: NEGOTIATING THE SELF IN THE LAND OF THE COLLECTIVE
Mar 6: 2:00pm-3:00pm
EWC Gallery, Burns Hall, Washington D.C.
Billie Lee, a Korean-American interdisciplinary artist, will give a multimedia presentation on her experience travelling in North Korea in August of 2008. This event is held in conjunction with the current EWC Gallery exhibition "Touching the Hearts and Minds of the People: North Korean Art on Paper."