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A list of international relations events in the DC area.

Calendar for the Week of March 7, 2011

SAVE THE DATE:

Islam and Western Society. April 5th, 2011. 6:30 PM Western Presbyterian Church

 

Islam and Western Society

April 6: 6:30pm

2401 Virginia Ave

Conflict Solutions International is presenting “Islam and Western Society.” With the growing influx of immigrants to Europe and America, some people feel uncomfortable with the new cultures that are taking hold, which may question their established traditions. Since 9/11 this phenomenon seems to be more evident among growing Muslim communities. CSI will explore the issue of compatibility between some forms of Islam and western society. This program will feature speakers who consider radical Islam a threat to western society, as well as others who will counter that such thoughts are only part of a larger phenomenon of Islamophobia. A non-alcohol reception will follow the program.  RSVP: CSIeventsDC@gmail.com

Week of March 07

PERFORMING KOREANNESS: NEGOTIATING THE SELF IN THE LAND OF THE COLLECTIVE

Mar 6: 2:00pm-3:00pm

EWC Gallery, Burns Hall, Washington D.C.

Billie Lee, a Korean-American interdisciplinary artist, will give a multimedia presentation on her experience travelling in North Korea in August of 2008. This event is held in conjunction with the current EWC Gallery exhibition "Touching the Hearts and Minds of the People: North Korean Art on Paper."

Unrest in The Middle East: Scenes From the Revolution

Mar 7: 10:00am-11:30am

Falk Auditorium, The Brookings Institution, 1775 Massachusetts Ave., NW

The democratic wave sweeping across the Arab world has irrevocably altered the strategic and political landscape of the region. As Egypt seeks to define itself in the post-Mubarak era, many seemingly stable Gulf monarchies now face similar protests, and hostile actors like Iran and al-Qaeda are seeking to interject themselves as well.

Holocaust Revisionism, Ultranationalism, and the Nazi/Soviet "Double Genocide" Debate in Eastern Europe

Mar 7: 12:00pm-1:00pm

Woodrow Wilson Center, 6th floor Flom Auditorium, NW Washington DC.

Please note that seating for this event is available on a first come, first served basis-no reservations required. Please call on the day of the event to confirm. Please bring an identification card with a photograph (e.g. driver's license, work ID, or university ID) as part of the building's security procedures.

"Becoming Asia: Change and Continuity in Asian International Relations Since World War II"

Mar 7: 12:00pm-2:00pm

Room 806, The Rome Building

Richard Wich, former SAIS professorial lecturer of Asian Studies, will discuss this topic. For more information and to RSVP, contact zji@jhu.edu or 202.663.5816.

Turkey in Europe, the Middle East and Beyond

Mar 7: 12:30pm-1:30pm

SAIS, Rome Building Auditorium, 1619 Massachusetts Ave., N.W.

Namik Tan, Turkish ambassador to the United States, will discuss this topic. Members of the public should RSVP to the SAIS Center for Transatlantic Relations at transatlanticrsvp@jhu.edu or 202.663.5880

Al Qaeda's Operating Environments: A New Approach to the War on Terror

Mar 7: 2:00-3:30pm

Wohlstetter Conference Center, 12th Floor, AEI, 1150 17th Street, NW, Washington DC 20036

In February, US Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano testified before the House of Representatives that the threat al Qaeda and its affiliates pose to the United States was "at its most heightened state" since September 11, 2001. In the last eighteen months, al Qaeda's sanctuaries abroad have facilitated a number of attacks and plots against the American homeland.

CSIS Forum on Advancing U.S. Leadership in Global Health

Mar 7: 3:00pm - 5:30pm

Grand Hyatt Washington, Independence Ballroom, 1000 H Street NW, Washington D.C., 20001

U.S. leadership, so fundamental to the historic global health achievements of the past decade, is being put to the test by today’s rising political and budgetary turbulence and increasingly polarized debate over how best to advance America’s global goals.

Women Working for Women

Mar 7: 5:30pm-6:45pm

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602, 1957 E Street, NW, Washington DC

Afeefa Syeed, Senior Culture and Development Advisor, Asia and Middle East Bureaus, USAID In honor of the International Women's Day Centenary, this panel will explore the diverse experiences of women working for women's empowerment.

Light snacks will be provided. Please RSVP at: http://bit.ly/ijbcPR

Sponsored by the Global Gender Initiative, the Institute for Global and International Studies, and The Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Washington

Irving Kristol and the Neoconservative Persuasion

Mar 7: 5:30pm-7:00pm

Wohlstetter Conference Center, 12th Floor, AEI, 1150 17th Street, NW, Washington DC 20036

The recent publication of forty-seven heretofore uncollected essays by the late Irving Kristol (The Neoconservative Persuasion: Selected Essays, 1942–2009, Basic Books) provides an occasion for a fresh consideration of that "persuasion." What is the neoconservative persuasion, where did it come from, and where does it lead?

The Joseph Cedar Film Retrospective: Time of Favor

Mar 7: 8:00pm-10:00pm

Room 113, 1957 E Street, NW, Washington DC

Yaron Peleg and Dan Schwartz will speak before presenting Time of Favor, Israeli writer-director Joseph Cedar's debut film. The movie plays out a psychologically complex love triangle in the middle of terrorist conflict in Israel's West Bank. Please RSVP at: http://tinyurl.com/aTimeOfFavor. Sponsored by the Middle East Policy Forum, which is presented with the generous support of ExxonMobil, and Gelman Library


Winning or Losing the "End State" in Iraq

Mar 8: 9:00am-10:30am

CSIS B1 Conference Center, 1800 K Street, NW, Washington DC, 20006

Iraq faces a difficult transition as the vast majority of U.S. military forces that have played a vital role in securing and developing the country will be out of Iraq by the end of 2011. As the U.S. State Department takes the lead in 2012, Iraq faces a number of problems, including ongoing violence, still-developing governance, a weak justice system, and slow economic development.

Cooperative Threat Reduction in the 21st Century

Mar 8: 9:30am-11:00am

Hudson Institute, Washington, D.C. Headquarters

Cooperative Threat Reduction (CTR) in today's world must address the complex challenges posed by weapons of mass destruction (WMD) to national security and global stability.  Effective CTR requires a network of diverse stakeholders to secure WMD-related materials, technologies, and knowledge; prevent their misuse; and reduce or mitigate the risks caused by their availability.

Civil Society-Military Relations and Human Security

Mar 8: 9:30am-11:00pm

Johns Hopkins SAIS, Kenny Auditorium, 1740 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington D.C., 20036

In response to the challenges and frustrations in Afghanistan and Iraq, top US military and political leaders call for strengthened civilian capacities and more effective civil-military cooperation. Civilian government, civilian contractors, civil society organizations (CSOs) and the civilian public are very different kinds of "civilians."

Latin America’s Bus Rapid Transit Boom–Lessons for U.S. Public Transportation

Mar 8: 9:30am-11:00am

Falk Auditorium, The Brookings Institution, 1775 Massachusetts Ave., NW, Washington, DC

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) has positioned itself as one of the most important additions to sustainable transport in the world, significantly improving urban mobility and lowering the cost of public transit. During the last ten years, 97 cities have implemented BRT corridors, many of them located in Latin America.

Energy Policy: Above All, Do No Harm

Mar 8: 10:30am-11:30am

Wohlstetter Conference Center, 12th Floor, AEI, 1150 17th Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036

Now that a new Congress has been sworn in, what's next on the horizon for energy policy? John Rowe, Exelon’s chairman and CEO, submits that modern energy policy should focus on long-term, economically rational solutions. Congress must allow market forces to work and embrace our country's abundant supply of domestic natural gas.

"ThinkImpact Brown Bag Session With Saul Garlick"

Mar 8: 12:30pm-2:00pm

Room 206, The Rome Building

Saul Garlick, founder and director of ThinkImpact and a SAIS graduate, will be the featured speaker at this brown bag luncheon. For more information, contact amayer4@jhu.edu.

Chinese National Identity and National Identity Gaps in East Asia

Mar 8: 4:00pm-5:15pm

Woodrow Wilson Center, NW, Washington, DC

National identity discourse strongly influences the behavior of states within East Asia, providing evidence of a national identity syndrome, which is most intense in today’s China. When discourse in one state demonizes another, we find evidence also of national identity gaps.

Film Screening: Act of Dishonor

Mar 8: 4:30pm-6:30pm

Media and Public Affairs building, Room 306, 805 21st Street, NW

Join the Institute for Public Diplomacy and Global Communication and Nelofer Pazira, director of Act of Dishonor for a special screening and discussion about the film.

Act of Dishonour is about honour killing. It is an eloquent and sensitive, though brutal portrait of life in Afghanistan - part lament against injustice, part testament to the spirit of a people who have survived decades of war. Please RSVP at: http://gwactofdishonor.eventbrite.com/. Sponsored by the Institute for Public Diplomacy and Global Communication and E1 Entertainment


Green Governance Victories and Ongoing Challenges in China

Mar 9: 9:00am-11:00am

Woodrow Wilson Center, 5th Floor Conference Room, Washington DC

The New Year calls for introducing a new interview format for some of our meetings so come join us for a fast moving conversation with four leading Chinese environmental and energy lawyers who will reflect on major events and trends over the past year that have impacted pollution control and energy law enforcement and empowerment of citizens.

The Promotion of Sustainable Mining and Energy Activities in Peru

Mar 9: 11:00am-12:30pm

Room 505, 1957 E Street, NW, Washington DC

Mr. Sánchez Gamarra became Peru's Minister of Energy and Mines in October 2008. He has led numerous institutions in Peru, including COPRI and ElectroPerú. He holds M.A. degrees from GW and the Escuela de Administración de Negocios para Graduados (ESAN).Please RSVP at: http://tiny.cc/406al. Sponsored by the Latin American and Hemispheric Studies Program

WHY SOUTHEAST ASIA WILL BE THE COCKPIT OF 21ST CENTURY GEOPOLITICS

Mar 9: 12:00pm-1:15pm

1819 L Street, NW, Washington, DC, Second Floor Conference Room

Southeast Asia is assumed to be a stable, benign sub-regional backwater of little consequence when stacked up against great power relations in Asia. This is dangerously misguided, and overlooks some compelling strategic trends that will place Southeast Asia at the center of Asia’s evolving order in the decade ahead.

Book Presentation: Bosnia Remade: Ethnic Cleansing and Its Reversal

Mar 9: 12:00pm-1:30pm

Woodrow Wilson Center, 5th Floor Conference Room, Washington DC

The book Bosnia Remade: Ethnic Cleansing and Its Reversal (Oxford University Press, 2011) is an authoritative account of ethnic cleansing and its partial undoing from the onset of the 1990s Bosnian wars up through the present.

Stimson Chairman's Forum with Senator Lindsey Graham

Mar 9: 12:00pm-1:30pm

The Stimson Center, 1111 19th Street NW, 12th Floor

The Chairman's Forum is a strategic conversation, featuring respected opinion leaders in the foreign and security policy arena. Lincoln Bloomfield, Jr., Stimson's Chairman of the Board, holds these informal discussions about eight times a year to address the most relevant global issues we face today.

Remembering Indonesia's War of Independence: Identity, Politics, and Military History

Mar 9: 12:30pm-1:45pm

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602, 1957 E Street, NW, Washington DC

Professor Spector received his B.A. from Johns Hopkins and his MA and Ph.D. from Yale. He has served in various government positions and on active duty in the Marine Corps from 1967-1969 and 1983-1984, and was the first civilian to become Director of Naval History and the head of the Naval Historical Center.

"U.S. Policy Toward Human Rights in Russia: A Critique"

Mar 9: 12:30pm-2:00pm

Room 812, The Rome Building

David Kramer, executive director of Freedom House, former U.S. assistant secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights and Labor and former U.S. deputy assistant secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs, will discuss this topic. For more information and to RSVP, contactegerasimov@jhu.edu or 202.663.5795.

The Egyptian Uprising: Context and Contestation

Mar 9: 12:30pm-1:30pm

SAIS: Room 736, Bernstein-Offit Building, 1717 Massachusetts Ave., N.W

Diane Singerman, professor of government at the School of Public Affairs at American University, will discuss this topic. Members of the public should RSVP to the SAIS African Studies Program at itolber1@jhu.edu or 202.663.5676

Reviewing the Obama-Calderon Meeting"

Mar 9: 12:45pm-1:45pm

Room 517, The Nitze Building (main building)

Francisco Gonzalez, Riordan Roett Associate Professor of Latin American Studies at SAIS, and Sergio Aguayo, professor at El Colegio de Mexico and a SAIS graduate, will discuss this topic. For more information and to RSVP, contact jzurek1@jhu.edu or 202.663.5734.

A Regional Approach to Regional Problems: Prospects for OSCE - CICA Cooperation

Mar 9: 3:00pm-7:00pm

Center for Strategic and International Studies, B1 Conference Room, 1800 K Street, NW, Washington DC, 20006

The Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) and Conference on Interaction and Confidence-Building Measures in Asia (CICA) have been playing a more active role on the world stage. Turkey assumed the Chairmanship of CICA in June 2010 and cooperated closely with Kazakhstan which had the Chairmanship of OSCE throughout 2010.

Tunisia’s Democratic Transition: Challenges & Perspectives

Mar 9: 4:00pm-5:00pm

Woodrow Wilson Center, 6th Floor Auditorum, Washington DC

Nazeh Ben Ammar President of the Tunisian American Chamber of Commerce (TACC)

Issam Belhaj TACC Delegate and Founder and CEO of IB Consulting

Maher Kallel TACC Delegate and Co-Founder and Executive Vice President for International Investment, Poulina Group Holdings

Tunisia’s Democratic Transition: Challenges & Perspectives

Mar 9: 4:00pm-5:00pm

Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholar

Co-sponsored with the Tunisian American Chamber of Commerce, National U.S. – Arab Chamber of Commerce, and American Tunisian Association
Speakers:Nazeh Ben Ammar, President of the Tunisian American Chamber of Commerce (TACC). Issam Belhaj, TACC Delegate and Founder and CEO of IB Consulting.Maher Kallel, TACC Delegate and Co-Founder and Executive Vice President for International Investment, Poulina Group Holdings

Rock and Roll, Disco Mafia, and the Collapse of Communism

Mar 9: 4:00pm-5:30pm

Room 505, 1957 E Street, NW, Washington DC

How did rock and disco music contribute to the fall of communism and the rise of post-Soviet capitalism? Why did Westernization during the two decades before the USSR's collapse lead to russification?

"Playing Our Game: Why China's Industrial Rise Doesn't Threaten the West"

Mar 9: 5:00pm-7:00pm

Kenney Auditorium, The Nitze Building (main building)

Edward Steinfeld, co-director of the China Energy Group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Industrial Performance Center and MIT professor of political economy, will discuss this topic. For more information and to RSVP, contact zji@jhu.eduor 202.663.5816.

Global Education Gala

Mar 9: 6:30pm-10:00pm

Ritz-Carlton Hotel , 1150 22nd,  Street NW, Washington, DC

The World Affairs Council-Washington, DC will hold its 2011 Global Education Gala on March 9 at the Ritz-Carlton in Washington, DC. The Honorable Ray LaHood, US Secretary of Transportation, will deliver theInternational Affairs Keynote.

Lessons of the "Arab Spring"

Mar 10: 10:00am-12:00pm
Wohlstetter Conference Center, 12th Floor, AEI 1150 17th Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036


In December 2010, a young man set himself on fire in the Tunisian town of Sidi Bouzid. This simple act created a chain reaction of mass uprisings that brought down governments in Tunisia and Egypt. Muammar al Gaddafi's regime in Libya may fall next.

House Appropriations: Budget Hearing - Department of State

Mar 10: 10:00am-12:00pm

2359 Rayburn

House Subcommittee on State and Foreign Operations Subcommittee Hearing on Budget Witness: The Honorable Hillary Clinton, Secretary of State. To access audio and video for this hearing, please visit: http://appropriations.edgeboss.net/wmedia-live/appropriations/59701/282_appropriations-hearing_091204.asx (copy and paste URL into browser). To access only audio for this hearing, please visit: http://appropriations.edgeboss.net/wmedia-live/appropriations/59753/340_appropriations-audioonly_100112.asx (copy and paste URL into browser).


A Preview of President Obama's Latin America Trip: The Ambassadors Speak

Mar 10: 11:00am-12:30pm

Allison Auditorium

In late March 2011, President Barack Obama will visit Brazil, Chile and El Salvador, making his first trip to South and Central America since taking office two years ago. The Heritage Foundation and the Council of the Americas are pleased to welcome host country Ambassadors to preview the President’s trip.

THE INTOLERANT INDIAN: WHY WE MUST REDISCOVER A LIBERAL SPACE

Mar 10: 12:00pm-1:150pm

1819 L Street, NW, Washington, DC, Second Floor Conference Room

Sixty-three years after independence, the issue of national identity remains unsettled in India. After the trauma of Partition, religious conflagrations such as the destruction of the Babri Masjid in Ayodhya in 1992 and the Gujarat riots of 2002 have left deep scars on the psyche of the nation. They have led to a fundamental debate over what kind of a nation India should be.

The View from the Field: Country-led Development and Implications for Donor Coordination

Mar 10: 12:00pm-1:30pm

Chemonics, 1717 H Street, NW, Suite 210, Washington, D.C.

Please join SID-Washington for its March 2011 Chapter Event. Donor coordination has featured in the development debate since the mid-1990s and the beginning of the World Bank’s Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers, and more so since the High Level Forums on Aid Effectiveness, Paris in 2005 and Accra in 2008. Recently, donor policy indicates a move towards greater country ownership and country-led development plans.

Popular Revolt in Yemen: Implications for Democracy and US Foreign Policy

Mar 10: 12:00pm-1:30pm

SEIU Building, 1800 Massachusetts Avenue NW

The Middle East Institute is proud to host Janet Sanderson, Christopher Boucek and Charles Schmitz for a discussion about the challenges facing Yemeni President Abullah Ali Saleh as he confronts a third month of anti-government protests and growing calls for secession from southern separatists.

HFAC Hearing: Assessing U.S. Foreign Policy Priorities and Needs Amidst Economic Challenges in the Middle East

Mar 10:2:00pm-3:00pm

Room 2172 of the Rayburn House Office Building

You are respectfully requested to attend the following open hearing of the Subcommittee on the Middle East and South Asia. WITNESSES The Honorable Jeffrey D. Feltman Assistant Secretary of State for Near Eastern Affairs. U.S. Department of State. Mr. George A. Laudato Administrator's Special Assistant for the Middle East U.S. Agency for International Development

Brazil in Regional and Global History

Mar 10: 3:00pm-5:00pm

Woodrow Wilson Center, 6th Floor Board Room, Washington DC

or almost 200 years - since Brazil’s independence from Portugal in 1822 – many Brazilian politicians and intellectuals, and many foreign observers, have believed that Brazil had the potential to become a great nation and a positive force in international affairs - largely because of its continental size and natural resources, but also because of its people, its society and culture, the absence of significant linguistic, religious, racial, ethnic or regional domestic conflict and (since the Paraguayan War in 1870

Russia's Cold War: From the October Revolution to the Fall of the Wall

Mar 10: 4:00pm-5:30pm

Woodrow Wilson Center, 5th Floor Conference Room, Washington DC

In his latest book entitled Russia's Cold War: From the October Revolution to the Fall of the Wall,Jonathan Haslam makes the case that the Cold War was not stable, but was characterized by constant wars, near-wars, and political upheavals on both sides.

Political Upheaval in the Maghreb: Paths and Choices

Mar 10: 4:30pm-5:30pm

Room 500, Bernstein-Offit Building, 1717 Massachusetts Ave., N.W.

William Zartman, professor emeritus at SAIS, and Karum Mezran, SAIS professorial lecturer of Middle East Studies, will discuss this topic. Members of the public should RSVP to the SAIS African Studies Program at itolber1@jhu.edu or 202.663.5676.

Bloodlands: Europe between Hitler and Stalin

Mar 10: 4:30pm-6:00pm

Voesar Conference Room, Suite 412, 1957 E Street, NW, Washington DC

In the lands between Berlin and Moscow, some fourteen million people were killed from 1933 to 1945 by German and Soviet policy. Professor Snyder will discuss the major killing policies, from Soviet terror through the Holocaust, with special attention to the overlap and interaction of Soviet and German power in the Bloodlands: western Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, Poland, and the Baltics.

Happy Hour for Human Rights!

Mar 10: 5:00pm-7:00pm

Tonic Restaurant and Bar, 3155Mt. Pleasant St.NW, Washington, DC 20010

Please support the Amnesty International-USA: Group 536 fundraiser for the upcoming event “Get on the Bus-DC” this April!Get on the Bus-DC (GOTBDC) is an annual day of human rights activism and education organized by Amnesty International- USA Group 536 of Washington, DC and a dedicated team of volunteer community organizers.

"U.S. Department of State Foreign Service Oral Assessment (FSOA) Preparation Session"

Mar 10: 5:00pm-8:00pm

Rome Building Auditorium, The Rome Building

This session will prepare applicants for the FSOA. For more information and to RSVP, send an email with the date of your oral assessment or the date you intend to schedule your assessment toreddickdir@gmail.com.

GREENING THE WAY: NEW TECHNOLOGY HELPS MEXICO KEEP CLIMATE CHANGE COMMITMENTS

Mar 10: 5:00pm-8:30pm

Mexican Cultural Institute, 2829 16th Street Northwest, Washington, D.C.

Please join us for an exciting talk-show style panel discussion about how developing countries are using innovative technology to track their progress in mitigating climate change. As the first developing country to track and report reductions of greenhouse gas emissions through an on-line reporting system, Mexico is meeting its pledge to fight climate change.

Targeting Arab Cities: Military and Architectural Expertise and the Moralization of the Politics of Empire

Mar 10: 6:00pm-7:30pm

Room 505, 1957 E Street, NW, Washington DC

Ahmed Kanna is the Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of the Pacific School of International Studies. His publications include Dubai: The City as Corporation (2011, University of Minnesota Press), "Flexible Citizenship in Dubai: Neoliberal Subjectivity in the Emerging City Corporation," Cultural Anthropology, 2010 and Rethinking Cities and Communities in the Global Era, co-edited with Xiangming Chen (forthcoming, Routledge Press).

Discover what OD and int'l dev practitioners can learn from each other

Mar 10:7:00pm

Johns Hopkins University - DC Campus, 1625 Massachusetts Avenue, NW Washington, DC

International and organization development practitioners dedicate themselves to improving others' quality of life. Discover where these fields intersect and how we can enrich each other's profession. Join me for an interactive, engaging conversation!”

Washington Area International Trade Symposium (WAITS)

Mar 11: 8:00am-4:45pm

Lindner Family Commons, Room 602, 1957 E Street, NW, Washington DC

The Washington Area International Trade Symposium (WAITS) is a forum that highlights cutting edge trade research at leading economic institutions in the Washington D.C. area. Its primary activity is sponsoring an annual research conference where scholars present their latest work. Researchers from The George Washington University, University of Maryland, Georgetown University, Johns Hopkins University (SAIS), the World Bank, and the Federal Reserve are all participants in the symposium.

The Annual U.S. Global Leadership Project: Development, Diplomacy, and Defense

Mar 11: 8:30am-9:45am

Gallup Headquarters: 901 F Street, NW

Meridian International Center and Gallup cordially invite you to attend a roundtable session on  The Annual U.S. - Global Leadership Project: Development, Diplomacy, and Defense. This Meridian and Gallup roundtable session will focus on the recently released 2010 survey data and polling results for the U.S. - Global Leadership Track, which provides an annual assessment of how the world views the leadership of the United States.

The Current State of Civil Society as a Reflection of the Paradoxes of Modern-Day Russia

Mar 11: 9:00am-10:30am

Woodrow Wilson Center, 5th Floor Conference Room, Washington DC

Ella Pamfilova, Senior Research Fellow, Center for the Study of Civil Society, State University-Higher School of Economics, and former Chair, Russian Presidential Council for the Promotion of Civil Society Institutions and Human Rights

Fault Lines in Global Health Debate

Mar 11: 9:30am-11:00am

Center for Strategic and International Studies, 1800 K Street, NW, Washington DC, 20006

Ambassador Jack Chow, Distinguished Service Professor of Global Health, Carnegie Mellon University and Former Assistant Director-General of the World Health Organization will affirm the resolution. Yanzhong Huang, Senior Fellow for Global Health, Council on Foreign Relations and Director for Global Health Studies, Seton Hall University will respond.

Greece’s Financial Crisis and the Future of the Euro

Mar 11: 10:00am-11:30am

Woodrow Wilson Center, 6th Floor Boardroom, Washington DC

Petros G. Doukas, Head of Capital Partners S.A. (Athens) and former Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs for the Hellenic Republic

Rebuilding America: The Role of Foreign Capital, Sovereign Wealth Funds and Global Public Investors

Mar 11: 10:00am-11:30am

Falk Auditorium, The Brookings Institution, 1775 Massachusetts Ave., NW, Washington, DC

Sovereign wealth funds, foreign government employee pension funds and foreign currency reserve funds control trillions of dollars in assets and are projected to maintain significant growth over the next decade. In today’s volatile global financial environment, the investment strategies of these global public investors will impact capital flows and influence markets around the world.

"Promoting Diplomacy Through Science"

Mar 11: 12:20pm-2:00pm

Room 200, The Rome Building

Peter Agre, director of Johns Hopkins University's Malaria Research Institute, president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and Nobel laureate, and Vaughan Turekian, director of the Center for Science Diplomacy at AAAS, will discuss this topic. For more information and to RSVP, contact developmentroundtable@jhu.edu or 201.739.7425.

Reasonable Expectations: Civil Society as Peacemaker – Findings From a Multi-Country Study

Mar 11: 2:00pm-3:00pm

SAIS: Kenney Auditorium, Nitze Building, 1740 Massachusetts Ave., N.W.

Thania Paffenholz, lecturer and senior researcher of peace, conflict and development at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Switzerland Lisa Schirch, director of the 3D Security Initiative at Eastern Mennonite University Michael Lund (moderator), senior specialist of conflict and peacebuilding at Management Systems International Inc.

Elites in the Hot Seat: The Rise of Populism in Europe and the United States

Mar 11: 2:00pm-3:30pm

Falk Auditorium, The Brookings Institution, 1775 Massachusetts Ave., NW, Washington, DC

While the Tea Party movement in the United States is decidedly different from the various anti-immigrant and nationalist political formations which have gained strength across Europe in recent years, they do share common characteristics. Having blossomed during the economic crisis, these movements question the ruling “elite” in Washington and Brussels, affirm the necessity of reasserting the people’s power, and pose a serious challenge to governance and the existing social contracts.

The Conflict Prevention & Resolution Forum Presents: Reasonable Expectations: Civil Society as Peacemaker  Findings from a Multi-Country Study

Mar 11: 2:00pm-4:00pm

Johns Hopkins SAIS, Nitze Building, Kenny Auditorium, 1740 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036

Civil society has been touted as an important component to addressing many issues in the developing world, such as poverty, state fragility, post-conflict recovery, and authoritarianism. But what exactly is meant by “civil society”? The concept has been associated with various terms from faith-based and non-governmental organizations to the private sector, and from “people power” to warlords. In her new book, Civil Society and Peacebuilding:

Solidarity With Solidarity: Western European Trade Unions and the Polish Crisis, 1980-1982

Mar 11: 4:00pm-5:30pm

Woodrow Wilson Center, 5th Floor Conference Room, Washington DC

The Polish crisis in the early 1980s provoked a great deal of reaction in the West. Not only governments, but social movements were also touched by the establishment of the Independent Trade Union Solidarnosc in the summer of 1980, the proclamation of martial law in December 1981, and Solidarnosc's underground activity in the subsequent years

Glimpse:  500 children, 500 cameras, 500 moments

Mar 11: 6:00pm-8:00pm

The Gallery, 2425 Virginia Ave, NW, Washington, DC  20037

Photojournalist Ramzi Haidar launched the project Glimpse to bring together photographers, journalists and artists with children ages 5-12 in Palestinian refugee camps in Lebanon. The children worked with these volunteers for one year to learn the basics of photography.